A Brief Rundown of Fashions

Fashion in Finland in a Nutshell

Design has been a part of the Finnish identity for a long time now. Finland takes pride in its design, especially when it is recognized outside the country. Design is usually dictated by time and place, but fashion is perhaps the most short-lived branch in design. Its value is determined by fashion arbiters and the consumers who opt for it.

Pure and clear postmodern style has always been the trademark of fashion in Finland. While the adjectives seem particular, they are by no means reserved only to Finnish style. They are global fads and a quintessential feature of Scandinavian design

But there are some aspects that can be seemingly originally Finnish, though. Finnish couturiers are often inspired by nature. It is, however, more evident in classic fashion than in current fashion. This can probably be attributed to the global trend for more conceptual and abstract inspirations. Present-day fashion view references which are too blunt crude and drab.

Another leading hallmark of Finnish fashion design is individuality. Finnish couturiers come up with fashion lines suited for consumers with a strong sense of style, not for the common people. It is a very prohibitive practice that substantially narrows the target market. In the end, fashion in Finland is more oriented towards design and aesthetics rather than maximizing bottom lines. The positive thing is that the fashion industry in Finland is more fascinating and varied than some of the rival fashion industries.

Finnish fashion also subscribes to globally appreciated values like morality and renewability. At its core is the understanding that the garment will be able to withstand time. Moreover, Finnish designers set their sights on giving their seamstresses a secure and equitable working environment. Their overseas factory cannot be situated in a country infamous for exploitative business practices.

There are conflicting views and opinions on the present state of the Finnish fashion business. There are pundits who criticize it as frozen and exclusionary while others think otherwise. The bottom line is the fashion industry in Finland is doing quite well. Exporting the garments can be very problematic with styles that are bound to ideas, brands and time. A current design can only last for six months in the shelf and is geared towards a limited market because of its higher markup and bold style.

The law of supply and demand applies to the fashion industry just like any business. A needy consumer will go through the process of coming up with a decision before actually buying a product or not. All human beings need clothes.

The dilemma facing Finnish fashion brands is that the local market is not big enough to support all of them but going global entails a lot of effort and capital. Penetrating foreign markets is always difficult and the fashion companies’ products that are susceptible to fluctuations and time of manufacture make it even harder.